Posts

Showing posts from January 20, 2013

Chris Matthews: Off Track

MSNBC's fast-talking newsman, Chris Matthews, who once actually criticized Ralph Nader, because he doesn't drive a car, says the U.S. needs to do something about Iran -- that doesn't have the bomb, to date, according to our intelligence agencies -- but why doesn't Matthews and his colleagues say anything about the three of four countries (Israel, India and Pakistan) that do have the bomb, but are not even within the confines of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. We guess because it's not politically correct to name those countries as outside international norms, but North Korea, the 4th non-NPT country that does have the bomb, is another matter, and thus criticism of its program is considered politically correct by the corporate media. So for commentators like Matthews and the powers-that-be, the issue of the sad state of nuclear affairs in this world (and it's sadder than the media lets on), is more about international political gamesmanship than real i…

Rights and Citizenship

It is a human right to reject the citizenship of the country of birth or to legally emigrate, as the singer, Tina Turner, just did by applying to become a citizen of Switzerland, but Uncle Sam should make it clear to any ex-American or would-be ex who takes that step, or wants to, that the decision is pretty much irrevocable and no one who goes that route will ever be able to apply for a residency visa (with exceptions), but only a travel visa. What Turner did is different than just going to another country to live for a long-term period or even permanently, because ex-patriates don't necessarily have to give up their citizenship to do that. It's not just Turner, however, as many ex-Americans are taking her path, some of them just trying to avoid taxes. Giving up citizenship, however, probably belies any Pledge of Allegiance that they may have taken, so perhaps it is just as well that they emigrated, not that there may not be an extraordinarily good reason for some to emigr…

Time to Change the Electoral College System

... but this is not an endorsement of a strict popular vote system.

We really do not have a problem with the Electoral College, in theory, although it has its pros and cons like any other system would, such as electing to the highest political office someone with the least votes nationally every several generations or so. However, now that chaos could ensue if that oddity of the Electoral College should occur again and legislatures -- like in Virginia -- are now using gamesmanship to alter the system for political favor, many people are saying it's time to make the system clearly simple, in other words, whoever gets the most votes nationally wins the election, period. That kind of system, too, would not be without problems, especially if the vote count were to be unimaginably close, one could imagine every little county auditor in the nation suddenly trying to empower themselves through backroom ballot box shenanigans, and then the entire nation would be Florida of 2000 inste…

The Whatever Society

We started to entitle this essay, "The Potemkin Society," but we decided on "whatever," because that seems to be the common American vernacular these days for "just about anything goes" and if it doesn't seem right or if it seems immoral, then we'll just look the other way and hope that all goes well anyway.  When the government used to break the Constitution, they at least tried to do it behind closed doors in the old days, but now the whatever society has enabled them to do it out in the open while federal judges nod and wink and hope that the common folk don't actually read the statutes and the Constitution.  There are no Frank Church-types (the late senator from Idaho) in Congress anymore to hold out-of-control intelligence agencies to account, so-called liberal presidents are given carte blanche to do things that a Nixon or a Bush (either one) would be called out for (especially if they seem hip and can read flowery platitudes with a fla…