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Showing posts from November 23, 2008

Red Wings

The Party of Commons will publish Chairman Mark Greene's biography through a blog, beginning on New Year's Day, 2009. This will be done in parts and will probably be completed before the end of the calendar year. We will call these writings, "Red Wings," in memory of Mark's childhood where he grew up just blocks from Detroit's Olympia Stadium; for a long time, the home of the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League. Olympia Stadium is in central Detroit, almost as middle Detroit as you can get, although a little ways from the avenue that divides east and west Detroit. This area is not downtown. The chairman grew up in Detroit during the heyday of Gordie Howe, the Red Wing's most famous player. The Detroit Red Wings have ceased to play in Olympia for some time now and currently play in Joe Louis Arena.

Mark started his childhood in Detroit, before moving to Indiana where he lived for most of his teens. On his way to being an important loyal oppositi…

"Commons" Through Thick and Thin

The Party of Commons' second anniversary passed a few days ago (Nov. 23) and Chairman Mark Greene has guided our fledgling party through thick and thin, and a successful course thus far. We have become the 4th most popular party in Washington state, based on the number of votes in recent elections. Only the "Big 2" major parties and the Constitution party are ahead of us in popularity in Washington.

Mark's run for Secretary of State put forth a significant election reform plan which included voting rights for those who are 16 and 17 years old, more hand counting of electoral ballots, defense of the "Top 2" primary and the initiative system, including proposing to make it easier to put initiatives on the ballot, and to no longer allow the voting machines of controversial voting machine companies to operate in Washington. Mark did not reach the top two in the primary, but he made the Party of Commons famous across the state of Washington, and he laid the groun…

The Transition Is Looking Shoddy

As usual, in our nation's "one party" (with two factions) forum, the choices for president weren't really that great, it was either Bush lite (Obama) or Bush-on-steroids (McCain). After all, independent candidates or third party candidates are unfairly and greatly disadvantaged in presidential elections and most others. So President-elect Obama was preferable for election to us under the circumstances. Now, Obama is living up to our skepticism with his so-called Team of Rivals transition. It may be a team of rivals alright, but it's also looking like a Team of Clintonites, with Hillary Clinton leading the pack as Obama's presumed choice for Secretary of State. The New York foreign policy hawk and neoconservative that threatens obliteration of nations, is apparently going to be the Obama administration's foreign policy leader. Clinton is not even Bush lite, she's just plain Bushian, which is probably why she didn't win the Democratic nomination. …

Democracy and the Territories

The United States of America has nine territories with an aggregate large population, and some individual territories with populations larger than some, if not several, of the 50 states. Yet, these citizens have no voting representatives in Congress, only non-voting delegates. The citizens of the District of Columbia, believe it or not, also do not have voting rights representation in Congress. It's time that changed. The territories and D.C. should have full voting rights representation in the House of Representatives, according to their population as is the case with the present 435 congressional districts, and each of these territories and D.C. should have at least one senator in the United States Senate. A compromise of one senator, instead of two senators like the states, will probably be necessary in order to get a new constitutional amendment ratified.

The House of Representatives will have to be enlargened to accommodate this proposal, which would establish at least a nomin…